Marine Life and Sea and Coast Animals

A separate display room shows the marine life of the Sakhalin region, and the thirty-four local species of sea mammal.
The display on ’Sea Otters’ draws our attention to the rare sea otter found on the islands of the Kurile Ridge. This animal is famous for its remarkable fur. It was nearly exterminated by the beginning of the 20th century. Its hunting was forbidden from 1911, and later the species was entered into the Red Book.
There is also material about the seals (Phocidae) inhabiting the sea and islands. The most wide-spread and numerous species are: the Bearded Seal (Erignathus barbatus), Spotted Larga Seal (Phoca larga), Ringed Seal (Phoca hispida), and Ribbon Seal (Phoca fasciata.)
The diorama called ’The habitat of northern fur seals on Tuleny Island’ focuses on one of the largest domiciles of eared seals (Otariidae). here the Northern Fur Seal (Callorhinus ursinus.) A scale model of Tuleny Island is exhibited. This small rocky island — 700 metres long — is in the Okhotsk Sea. In the summer and autumn breeding season about 80,000 fur seals live there, accompanied by a variety of sea birds. Guillemot (Uria aalge) make up the largest nesting colony of 200,000 birds. A close relative of the fur seal, Steller’s Sea-Lion (Eumetopias jubatus), also occupies the island, about 400 animals in total. There are twenty five habitats of these creatures in Sakhalin and the Kuriles. A map on display shows the habitats of Kurile sea otters and seals in the Sakhalin region. A large group of 50,000 fur seals is to be found on the northern Kurile ridge on Srednov and Lovushka Islands. Sea-lions are also found on the islands, but in considerably smaller numbers.
Twenty five species of cetacean (12 kinds of dolphin and 13 varieties of whale) live in the seas surrounding Sakhalin and the Kurile Islands, and eleven species are registered in the Red Book. The display shows portions of skeletons of modern large-toothed and whiskered whales, and petrified remnants of an ancient cetacean.
The most typical representatives of invertebrate animals are shown in the glass cases: sponges, molluscs, and crustaceans. Here you can also see the inhabitants of the Okhotsk Sea and the northern part of the Japanese Sea — edible fish including Pacific Ocean Salmon (Oncorhynchus) and exotic species such as the Hammer-headed Shark (Sphyrna zygaena), Sun-fish (Mola mola), Frog-fish (Aptocyclus ventri-cosus), Red Pufferfish ( Fugu rubripes), and Japanese Fox-fish (Percis japonicus.)

There is also material about the seals (Phocidae) inhabiting the sea and islands. The most wide-spread and numerous species are: the Bearded Seal (Erignathus barbatus), Spotted Larga Seal (Phoca larga), Ringed Seal (Phoca hispida), and Ribbon Seal (Phoca fasciata.)
The diorama called ’The habitat of northern fur seals on Tuleny Island’ focuses on one of the largest domiciles of eared seals (Otariidae). here the Northern Fur Seal (Callorhinus ursinus.) A scale model of Tuleny Island is exhibited. This small rocky island — 700 metres long — is in the Okhotsk Sea. In the summer and autumn breeding season about 80,000 fur seals live there, accompanied by a variety of sea birds. Guillemot (Uria aalge) make up the largest nesting colony of 200,000 birds. A close relative of the fur seal, Steller’s Sea-Lion (Eumetopias jubatus), also occupies the island, about 400 animals in total. There are twenty five habitats of these creatures in Sakhalin and the Kuriles. A map on display shows the habitats of Kurile sea otters and seals in the Sakhalin region. A large group of 50,000 fur seals is to be found on the northern Kurile ridge on Srednov and Lovushka Islands. Sea-lions are also found on the islands, but in considerably smaller numbers.
Twenty five species of cetacean (12 kinds of dolphin and 13 varieties of whale) live in the seas surrounding Sakhalin and the Kurile Islands, and eleven species are registered in the Red Book. The display shows portions of skeletons of modern large-toothed and whiskered whales, and petrified remnants of an ancient cetacean.
The most typical representatives of invertebrate animals are shown in the glass cases: sponges, molluscs, and crustaceans. Here you can also see the inhabitants of the Okhotsk Sea and the northern part of the Japanese Sea — edible fish including Pacific Ocean Salmon (Oncorhynchus) and exotic species such as the Hammer-headed Shark (Sphyrna zygaena), Sun-fish (Mola mola), Frog-fish (Aptocyclus ventri-cosus), Red Pufferfish ( Fugu rubripes), and Japanese Fox-fish (Percis japonicus.)

Twenty five species of cetacean (12 kinds of dolphin and 13 varieties of whale) live in the seas surrounding Sakhalin and the Kurile Islands, and eleven species are registered in the Red Book. The display shows portions of skeletons of modern large-toothed and whiskered whales, and petrified remnants of an ancient cetacean.
The most typical representatives of invertebrate animals are shown in the glass cases: sponges, molluscs, and crustaceans. Here you can also see the inhabitants of the Okhotsk Sea and the northern part of the Japanese Sea — edible fish including Pacific Ocean Salmon (Oncorhynchus) and exotic species such as the Hammer-headed Shark (Sphyrna zygaena), Sun-fish (Mola mola), Frog-fish (Aptocyclus ventri-cosus), Red Pufferfish ( Fugu rubripes), and Japanese Fox-fish (Percis japonicus.)

 

Exposition of the museum

Ground floor
Historical geology
The fauna of the Far Eastern seas
First floor
Plant and animal life
Showroom
Ancient cultures and indigenous peoples
In the depths of the ocean
Second floor
Postwar period. Modernity
The discovery and development of the islands
Before the war. World War II
Penal servitude






Kommunisticheskiy prospekt - 29
Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, Russia, 693010
mail@sakhalinmuseum.ru
+7 (4242) 72Ц75Ц55